Montessori: Honor the Work of Childhood 

Several months ago, I began doing some research on Maria Montessori's methods.  Her writing is rich with insights, not simply about teaching, but about the ways we think about and interact with our children.  I have made a few deliberate adjustments in my parenting style because of things I've read from Montessori, particularly in how … Continue reading Montessori: Honor the Work of Childhood 

Is Your Home Schooled Kid a Nerd?

Good. Maybe when he grows up, he'll have a job instead of sitting in your basement eating bonbons and playing Xbox. Keep up the good work!! In all seriousness, I have taught for twelve years and had countless conversations with parents about how their kids are doing socially. Far too often, they are concerned about … Continue reading Is Your Home Schooled Kid a Nerd?

Mother’s Education

Charlotte Mason educators often refer to the importance of "mother's education," a phrase that typically encompasses a mother's training in child-rearing, her study of child psychology and educational best practices, and for many moms, her personal spiritual growth through Bible studies and devotionals.  It may also include a mother's mastery of the material she is … Continue reading Mother’s Education

Charlotte Mason: Whole Child

Since making the decision to home school my children, currently ages one and three, I have been researching various methods of home schooling.  Over the next few weeks, I'd like to share with you some of the benefits I've seen in each of those methods.  If you are considering home schooling, this may help you … Continue reading Charlotte Mason: Whole Child

A Fierce Independence

A bit of wisdom from Maria Montessori today: "Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed." For our older son, that's basically every task now. Last month he hit three and dove headfirst into the world of "I can do it all by myself!" He is putting on shoes, … Continue reading A Fierce Independence

Snake Eyes!

Working with dice enhances number sense in young children by training them to look at a group of objects (the dots on the dice) and recognize how many are there without counting.  As children grow familiar with these common arrangements, they increase their awareness of how numbers are composed -- two columns of three makes six, … Continue reading Snake Eyes!