Montessori: Honor the Work of Childhood 

Several months ago, I began doing some research on Maria Montessori's methods.  Her writing is rich with insights, not simply about teaching, but about the ways we think about and interact with our children.  I have made a few deliberate adjustments in my parenting style because of things I've read from Montessori, particularly in how … Continue reading Montessori: Honor the Work of Childhood 

Is Your Home Schooled Kid a Nerd?

Good. Maybe when he grows up, he'll have a job instead of sitting in your basement eating bonbons and playing Xbox. Keep up the good work!! In all seriousness, I have taught for twelve years and had countless conversations with parents about how their kids are doing socially. Far too often, they are concerned about … Continue reading Is Your Home Schooled Kid a Nerd?

Summer Goals

Finally, finally, finally, summer is here! You cannot know unless you have ever taught middle school the blessed relief that Memorial Day weekend can bring. This new season brings a major shift in our day to day routine.  No more school means no work for Mommy, no 5:00 wake-up call, no rush-hour commute, no daycare... … Continue reading Summer Goals

Mother’s Education

Charlotte Mason educators often refer to the importance of "mother's education," a phrase that typically encompasses a mother's training in child-rearing, her study of child psychology and educational best practices, and for many moms, her personal spiritual growth through Bible studies and devotionals.  It may also include a mother's mastery of the material she is … Continue reading Mother’s Education

Montessori: Flow

I'm no kind of perfect Montessori mom.  In fact, I do horrifying things like make my babies sleep in a crib and let them play with toys that are plastic.  I know, right? But I do think Montessori has some rich insights that are helpful to any parents, whether you are full-on into her method … Continue reading Montessori: Flow

Geometry Across the Curriculum

I use geometric drawing across the curriculum in several projects.  Below is an in-progress shot of an 8th-grader's design for a stained glass window, an assignment from my medieval history unit that incorporates symbolism along with geometric design. In world history, we use geometric drawing when studying Roman and Islamic mosaics, and students have the … Continue reading Geometry Across the Curriculum

No Wind, No Problem

My three-year-old is forever teaching me about determination (or "stubbornness," depending on the particulars).  This week, it was the kite he got in his Easter basket.  Every day, he's been looking out the window and declaring that it's really windy outside.  It is not.  Finally I caved and let him take it out.  Predictably, there … Continue reading No Wind, No Problem